The Bulk Isle

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morticaixavier
The Bulk Isle

I don' t know how many of you belong to food co-ops or frequent 'health food' stores. But I do. And I find the bulk isle to be an excellent place to find new brewing ingredients.

My Co-op bulk isle contains flaked grains of many kinds, Whole unmalted grains of many kinds, Dried fruits, spices and Herbs, coffee, syrups, honeys, and other sweeteners.

Last batch I brewed I used flaked rye from this isle, Next batch is going to be flaked Kamut maybe, or spelt or quinoa mayhaps.

Amaranth ale anyone?

denny
denny's picture
When I saw "Bulk Isle" I

When I saw "Bulk Isle" I thought you'd moved to an island!

I've had an amaranth beer, but I've never brewed one. Do you need to do a cereal mash with kamut, spelt, or quinoa?

Life begins at 60....1.060, that is!

morticaixavier
Argh, Damn. sometimes I hate

Argh, Damn. sometimes I hate this language! It just makes me tear up and makes me want to tear up a dictionary (see what I mean?)

anyway, I am starting with flaked grains which shouldn't need a cereal mash as they are pre-gelatinized.

Quich search looks like, at least with quinoa you COULD get away without it but it wouldn't hurt. Gelatinization temps are slightly higher than for wheat or barley. so if you started your mash pretty high and the quinoa was milled fairly fine it would work. but like with wheat if you wanted to do a cereal mash it would probably boost your efficiency.

"Remember, kids, the Only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down." - A. Savage

Steve Ruch
Some regular groceries also

Some regular groceries also have good bulk aisles. I've gotten flaked oats, flaked red wheat, and flaked triticale there to brew with.
There are also lots of various sugars and other fermentables you can get. If you were willing to live with baker's yeast you could get all you need to brew something using food stamps. I'm not saying I would or anyone should, but it is possible.

Steve
"Remember, I'm pullin' for ya: we're all in this together" Red Green

morticaixavier
Okay, round two of this is in

Okay, round two of this is in the mash tun.

This time using Flaked Kamut.

The Base Recipe:
The Grist (grain only)
41.27% CA Select Pale Malt
27.51% Munich 10L (Great Western)
31.22% Flaked ???? (first batch was Flaked Rye, this one kamut, the next... tritical maybe?

Additionally I am adding .9 k Honey to the 10 gallon batch.

The Hops:
17.9 IBU FWH (Calculated as a 20 minute addition) Horizon Whole Cone
1.4 IBU Challenger Pellet at 5 minutes
1.3 IBU Belgian Goldings pellets at 5 minutes
1 oz Challenger at flame out (actually a couple minutes after flameout for length of chilling) (For 10 gallons)
1 oz Belgian Goldings at flame out (actually a couple minutes after flameout for length of chilling) (For 10 Gallons).

I am going to try to keep the basic recipe as close to this as possible as I experiment.

When I have found the perfect adjunct grain I will start playing with the adjunct sugar.

The first batch had slightly less flaked grain because I also had ~ .5 kilo of malted wheat. Additionally the hops in the first batch were pacific gem in place of horizon and challenger.

"Remember, kids, the Only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down." - A. Savage

morticaixavier
The first batch is in the keg

The first batch is in the keg... but I am running out of co2. pfft. I will post some tasting notes either tonight or tomorrow.

"Remember, kids, the Only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down." - A. Savage

morticaixavier
Took a growler of batch #1

Took a growler of batch #1 to brew club last night. was well received. Those members that filled out score sheets scored it in the high 30's - low 40's. which, after taking into account the tendency for brew club scores to run a little high maybe translates to mid 30's. and it's only two weeks old.

Brett character is minimal at this point. just a hit of funk that almost comes across as an edge of hop bitterness. I imagine that will change as time goes by. I have to get a few of these in bottles now that the keg is cleared up.

"Remember, kids, the Only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down." - A. Savage

morticaixavier
Took a sample...

Took a sample...

of one half of batch # 2 last night. I had already added the honey, which likely through off the reading a bit but I didn't stir it in or anything so I doubt it threw it off that much.

This was the half pitched with dregs from the Almanac Brewers Reserve bottle. It was sitting around 1.020 still down from 1.038ish (before the honey) but there is a think head of krausen on the top. So thick in fact that I had to punch it down like the cap on a batch of fruit wine. I suspect this relates to my other thread about how much Irish Moss one can use.

It was hard to get a clean reading because there was so much co2 in solution that it kept forming a head so I couldn't read the hydrometer and I suspect it was also lifting hydro a bit.

Flavour was pretty nice. actually quite neutral at this point with a fair amount of honey (I had JUST added it). this one will get some time to let the bugs do their thing though.

"Remember, kids, the Only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down." - A. Savage

morticaixavier
Update on Batch 2

Update on Batch 2
I have been sipping the 'clean' half of batch 2 for a week or so now. It's had time to clear up some and the green beer yeast bite has disappeared. It's still quite good but I miss the rye. The Kamut gives it a Wheaties note that isn't unpleasant but personally I prefer the rye spice. A little more brett on the repitch of this yeast as well, some leather/farmyard notes still pretty subtle though. I filled 6 bottles right after kegging primed with table sugar for later comparison with batch 1

Sampled the buggie half of batch 1 (two kinds of brett and somke lambic dregs as well as a few lbs of cherries) and it's really nice. If I didn't like funky beer I wouldn't like it. The character is still subtle enough that I am going ot let it ride for a while longer. I did fill three bottles as I needed to make room in the carboy for more cherries. The ones that have been in there for a while are a truly disgusting pale bloated corpse color at this point and the beer has taken on a really nice color, just a hint of red. Not sure if that is from the cherries for a little oxidation though. it is more red than brown which is good. and I don't taste any oxidation at this point.

"Remember, kids, the Only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down." - A. Savage

morticaixavier
Okay I think I have settled

Okay I think I have settled on triticale for the next batch, which won't be brewed for a couple weeks yet, probably not till after NHC. Triticale is interesting, it's a hybrid between wheat and rye. I really like the flavour contribution of the rye in batch 1 but I like the fullness in the mouthfeel that I get with the flaked wheat. I am hoping the triticale will give me a bit of both. we will see. I suppose it's always possible to use both but it starts to get too complex.
Another nice thing about the triticale is it's grown right around here.

"Remember, kids, the Only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down." - A. Savage

morticaixavier
Well I was unimpressed with

Well I was unimpressed with Triticale. It didn't have the yummy bread/grapenuts notes that the kamut had and didn't have the spice that the rye had.

I also started to get annoyed with the 'raw' flavor I started to notice in all these beers.

Iteration number 4 is in the planning. This time malted rye and malted wheat.

"Remember, kids, the Only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down." - A. Savage

erockrph
One of the local breweries in

One of the local breweries in my area are brewing a Saison with local pils, pale malt, wheat, rye, oats and spelt. While I can't say that I can necessarily pick out each ingredient in the finished beer, but there is a nice level of complexity in the malt that works really well in that beer. In the right beer I think you can get away with a complex blend of base malts.

morticaixavier
I agree, that's part of why I

I agree, that's part of why I am starting with the farmhouse style as a base. I feel like of all the styles it really benefits from a complex grist most. I think about the farmhouse brewers of yore, brewing it up with what ever grains did well that year and yielded a good surplus. If grains weren't the best harvest maybe bump it with a little honey and/or fruit.

I'm not saying that this recipe won't end up pretty complex, in fact I am already starting to plan the next phase which is playing around with the simple sugar adjunct, currently it's orange blossom honey but I am going to try it with a variety of native and wild fruits once I have settled on the unmalted grain adjunct, or at least once I have decided that I have enough data on the grain adjunct.

"Remember, kids, the Only difference between screwing around and science is writing it down." - A. Savage