Volume of Wort

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kfun123
Volume of Wort

All of the recipes state something like "For 5.5 gallons at 1.086.....". Is that volume the volume of wort at ambient temperature after the boil? Or is that the expected volume post fermentation?

To covert these recipes to BIAB that volume number is critical.

Thanks

Kyle

jason.mundy
jason.mundy's picture
When reading a recipe, I

When reading a recipe, I always consider the recipe volume and SG to be what is in the kettle at the end of the boil/chilling.

If you feel the batch size is not large enough for losses that you may incur... then scale the recipe to a larger batch size to make up for it. i.e. If you want 5 gallons into the keg, then scale the recipe to have 6 gallons in the kettle at the end of the boil. You can expect to lose .5 gallons going into the fermenter. And another .5 gallons into the keg.

jason.mundy
jason.mundy's picture
BTW, I love BIAB. I switched

BTW, I love BIAB. I switched to BIAB from a 3 keggle system 6 months ago...

Quicker brew day, No pumps losing their prime, No clogged lines, No stuck mashes. Strike water temps are only 6°F over mash temps, so there is little chance of going over in strike temperature.

There are a lot of benefits to the process.

The only drawbacks I would give it are that you need a pot about 2x the size of batch. But then again, you only need one pot. Also the wort tends to have more trub that a traditional 3 vessel batch.

drew
drew's picture
Jason's on it - when I write

Jason's on it - when I write a recipe, the volume is the final kettle volume. Namely, how much finished wort you've produced at that gravity and IBU level.