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Biotransformation - Dry Hop at Krausen vs. Dry Hop at Rest

drew's picture

Our brewing partner in "science", Marshall "Brulosophy" Schott released results of a biotransformation experiment here. In it he brewed a NE IPA recipe that was double dry hopped. Two batches brewed with the first fermenting out for a few days before the second was brewed. The second batch received the first dose of dry hops while the beer was at high krausen. The first batch received it's dry hops after the beer was done fermenting.

Subject: 

Experiment Status: 

Does Dry Hopping a Beer During High Krausen Produce a Organoleptic Difference?

Draft Carbonation - Modified Slam/Shake vs. Gradual Carbonation

drew's picture

It's happened to us all - too many kegs, not enough time left to "properly" carbonate your beer before it needs to be served. Who knows, maybe you have a party or club meeting. Maybe you just need a beer, damnit. 

Subject: 

Experiment Status: 

Does a modified slam and shake method result in a beer observably different than one done by the longer sit and wait methodology?

BrewTan - Or Do Oxygen Scavenging Chemicals Change the Beer Character

drew's picture

There's been a big kerfluffle in the online brewing world this year over "LoDO" brewing aka Low Dissolved Oxygen brewing. Proponents of the extremely complex methodology theorize that by reducing the amount of oxygen entrained at all times in the mash or the boil that you prevent oxidative reactions that damage the beer's flavor and reduces the overall malt character.

The reason they're obsessed is they're driven to recreate the "it" character they claim German beers have with their malts that they find lacking in many commercial and homebrews.

Subject: 

Experiment Status: 

Are beers brewed with BrewTan B, organoleptically different than beers brewed without

New England IPA Series - Is it the Yeast?

drew's picture

The IPA is the king of the current American craft beer scene and in recent years the new belle of the Hop Ball has hailed from New England. Heady Topper from Vermont's Alchemist was the first to catch beer lover's attention and since then many beers in the same vein have appeared. Skipping over a great many of the discussion of the style centering on the word "juicy" - a number of beer exhibit an intense hazy appearance. This murk is a controversial part of the equation (not every example has it for instance).

Subject: 

Experiment Status: 

Does the yeast choice generate the haze in a "New England Style IPA"
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